A political blog of the right

Socrates, Hegel or Both? An Enquiry

Historically, philosophy has been both the domain of the layman and the academic. In today’s world, to study philosophy involves enrolling in an academic institution – a college or university which offers degrees in philosophy or Classics will set the budding thinker on the path to the doctorate which will affirm his or her status within the field of philosophical enquiry. For some, the academic door will always the closed: the cost of higher education is a big part of this, not the mention the time involved researching and…

The Hebrides – An Aesthetic Journey

I recently returned home from two-week long journey away from my cosy surroundings in the South of England. I had been spending some time in Cumbria, but a week-and-a-half before that on the Isle of Eriskay in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. From there, my fiancée and I saw the isles of North and South Uist, Benbecula, and all the while were following in the footsteps of such great creative figures and philosophers: Dr Samuel Johnson immortalised his journey to the same place in 1775 as A Journey to the Western Isles of…

Recent Events Demonstrate the Need for Political Justice

When we talk about justice in a political context, we do not merely mean the fair administration and interpretation of the law. Political justice is about finding the best form of government to nurture society’s improvement, the safety of its citizens and the representation of its electors. I myself am increasingly coming around to the opinion that neither our state nor our politicians who govern it have any kind of justice in mind whatsoever, or that if they do, then it is a deeply misguided interpretation of justice. For a…

The Tories will Sweep this election – but do they deserve to?

My initial reaction to the news that Theresa May was to hold a snap general election was too profane to publish – I can’t deny that it took me by surprise. On the face of things there seemed no need for this, but thinking about it now, whether or not Theresa May was to call an election the opportunity for a massive victory was there. A lot can change in three years, and by calling an election in two months’ time the Tories have a huge opportunity to crush their opposition and cement their power for the next five years.  …

The Church of England – on its knees, but not for prayer

It is no secret that the United Kingdom, or rather specifically England, has an Established Church, the Church of England, which has officially served the nation for almost 500 years along with its sister Churches, (more recently) the Church in Wales and the Church of Ireland. Today of course, there remains a sword of Damocles suspended above the head of the Church: the sword of secularism. Whilst there are legitimate arguments in favour of the separation of Church and State, it has been the preserve of conservatives since…

An Elegy for Reform: The Need for Social Toryism

I am now approaching my second year as a member of the Conservative and Unionist Party, a party which I joined in the hope of playing a role within one of the oldest political traditions that the United Kingdom still retains. As time goes on however, I consistently receive mixed messages about the future of the party which I do (I will admit) love. The Conservative Party, with every passing year, month, perhaps even day, appears to be losing the ideology on which the fabric of its success has been built. Jacob Rees-Mogg has…